Product Application

MECHANISM OF OUR PURE BATTERY ACID :  ( PURITY OF MATERIALS PLAYS THESE ELECTROCHEMICAL REACTION  ) ----

CREATION :
A traditional lead-acid cell, when created, has both of its terminals connected to plates of an identical material: lead. This is a little counterintuitive given that most batteries rely on different metals' potential when immersed in an electrolyte. Since there is no potential between the plates themselves, and because lead is not dissolved by sulfuric acid, the cell is stable. The created battery has no charge, and no polarity.
Anode Reaction: None.
Cathode Reaction: None.
 

INITIAL CHARGE :
Initial charging establishes which plate will be the anode, and which the cathode. The process is driven by the forcible removal of electrons from the cathode and the forcible introduction of them to the cathode. This splits the water into Hydrogen (which bubbles and is drawn off) and Oxygen, which binds with the lead on the cathode, producing lead (II) oxide.
Anode Reaction: 2H+(aq) + 2e− → H2(g)Cathode Reaction: Pb(s) + 2H2O(l) → PbO2(s) + 2H+(aq) + 2e−

DISCHARGE :
During discharge, both plates are again returned to equal composition, but this time both plates become lead sulfate. The process is driven by the conduction of electrons from the cathode back into the cell at the anode.

Anode Reaction: Pb(s) + HSO−
4(aq) → PbSO4(s) + H+(aq) + 2e−
Cathode Reaction: PbO2(s) + HSO−
4(aq) + 3H+(aq) + 2e− → PbSO4(s) + 2H2O(l)
 

RECHARGING :
Subsequent charging places the battery back in its charged state, changing the lead sulfates into lead and lead oxides. The process is driven by the forcible removal of electrons from the anode and the forcible introduction of them to the cathode.

Anode Reaction: PbSO4(s) + H+(aq) + 2e− → Pb(s) + HSO−
4(aq)
Cathode Reaction: PbSO4(s) + 2H2O(l) → PbO2(s) + HSO−
4(aq) + 3H+(aq) + 2e−